Heading into week three of Best of SNO, we’ve already received more than 1,300 submissions from 161 different schools. Haven’t hit that “submit” button yet? Time to jump on the bandwagon.

From vaping to climate change protests to local TikTok celebrities, there are definitely some common coverage areas coming at many of you. However, we’ve also read a ton of unique submissions breaking out of those categories. These are some of the best stories of the past few weeks, written and submitted by students just like yours:


HB 126: A timeline of the abortion billby Emma Lingo, Kirkwood High School
“Within the last three months, Missouri passed one of the most restrictive laws in the country regarding abortion, blocked several attempts to initiate a state referendum and has been torn on renewing the medical license of the last Planned Parenthood that can perform abortions. For those not constantly glued to the news or just tired of reading it all, it can be nice to have stories broken down into bite-sized pieces — so here’s a timeline along with input from pro-life and pro-choice activists to guide you through the thicket of Missouri’s new law.”


Sexism in speech and debate: competitive speakers’ fight for their voiceby Tyler Kinzy, Parkway West High School
“It is the conversation that speech and debate coach Cara Borgsmiller is forced to have several times each season. ‘I talk openly about it, especially the first time they get a ballot that says something about it.’ You were rude to your opponents. Your tone of voice was annoying. Your skirt was too short. ‘It’ is the bias that women must confront at every speech and debate tournament.”


Won’t You Be My Neighbor? by Lucie Flagg, North Allegheny Senior High School
“‘I often say the true goal of Hello Neighbor is to help the refugees feel more comfortable and confident in their new lives here,’ said Davidson. ‘In particular for the moms, who struggle with taking care of little kids and many of whom lack the language to communicate in English, this is huge towards feeling independent and feeling like they’re contributing to the success of their families.’”


Mirror, Mirrorby Lizzie Kayser, Liberty High School
“Many students struggle to reconcile the reality of their bodies to an unattainable image. Five of Liberty’s girls have decided to share how this battle has affected their lives. Five athletes, scholars and leaders are embarking on an everyday journey to break past idealism and love themselves.”


Catching Memoriesby Emily Davis, Starr’s Mill High School
“For Evan, remembering his father Allen, a 2006 graduate from Starr’s Mill, is a matter of like father, like son. Hundreds of Pokemon cards, toys, and characters leave behind favored memories and ease the ache that accompanies the death of his father.”


Female Football Player Breaks New Groundby Lexie Diekroeger and Connor Del Carmen, Marquette High School
“‘The other day, she had a really clean block that I used as an example when talking to the team about proper blocking,’ Dieffenbach said. ‘No one anymore thinks twice about her being a girl because she has proven her ability and work ethic can help the team in so many ways.’”


Sophomore Jacob Waterman Becomes First La Salle Athlete to Kneel During National Anthem, Inspiring Others to Join Himby Maggie Rasch, La Salle Catholic College Preparatory
“‘I just want to bring attention to the subject and create a community that’s more inclusive and more respectful towards people and their differences,’ said Waterman, who hopes that ‘people are going to realize that it’s not about disrespecting our military, but it’s more towards the greater problem that’s happening in our country.’”


Dear Americaby Nicolas Reyes, Coppell High School
“America, your loved ones are dying and while I often feel I cannot keep doing so, I will continue pleading with you every time more perish. Sadness and fury make clicking my keys more difficult. Your people cannot keep dying. Your people cannot keep living in fear. Your “silent majority” cannot keep turning their cheeks and enjoying their silence. You must stand for so much more.”


Marching band takes more than just walking in timeby Emma Hutchinson, Prosper High School
“So we don’t kick a ball or swing a bat. We still play on a field. We still get points. We still give our all. And at the end of the night, we still wouldn’t want to be doing anything else.”

Read more great stories like these on Best of SNO.

And now, for two important announcements:

  • Tuesday marked the first day you could apply for SNO Distinguished Sites badges. Already, 26 schools have earned the Excellence in Writing badge by having three stories published on Best of SNO.
  • The first “Assignment Desk” topic of the 2019-2020 school year is … Vaping. Much has changed since you covered the topic last year. Then, it was trendy, albeit an unknown, and Juul was a verb. Now, a much scarier picture of its risks is being painted — double-digit deaths have been linked to it, states are banning sales of e-cigarettes and the FDA is watching it all very closely. With growing amounts of new information, show us how you are updating your coverage now by submitting those stories to Best of SNO.