“The idea of objectivity—I should make clear—it’s not neutrality, it’s not both-sides-ism, it’s not so-called balance. It’s never been that. That’s not the idea of objectivity. But once we do our reporting, once we do a rigorous job and we’re satisfied that we’ve done the job in an appropriate way, we’re supposed to tell people what we’ve actually found. Not pretend that we didn’t learn anything definitive. Not meet all sides equally if we know that they’re not equal. It’s none of that. It’s to tell people in an unflinching way what we have learned, what we have discovered.” Marty Baron, the executive editor of The Washington Post (and the person Liev Schreiber portrays in the Boston Globe movie, “Spotlight”), is retiring this month. He spoke at length about his career, journalism’s past and present, and more with the New Yorker: Marty Baron Considers His Time At The Washington Post

. . . From past, now to future: The New York Times’ new opinion editor grapples with where to go next. “We have made this commitment, we’ve brought in all of these resources, we’ve hired all these talented people. How do we make sure we’re constantly creating magic, being a laboratory for trying new things, and being at the cutting edge of opinion journalism?”

In other journalism

–  The man who captured the insurrection at the Capitol: “January 6 stands now as the most disruptive day of the photographer’s life and potentially the most definitive of his career.”

–  Taylor Swift, NYT photography assistant?

–  “The mass adoption of wireless headphones and smart devices, combined with people being home all day and not in public spaces, has created a boom for audio — and every big media and tech company is scrambling to claim a piece of it.” (Axios)