This blog could save your life– or at the very least, your sanity:

The After Deadline blog on the New York Times website is a fantastic resource for all grammatical and stylistic newsroom queries you may have.  From words that are almost (but not quite) right to the art of journalism prose, this blog can answer those obscure writing-related questions before you’ve even had the chance to ask.

Professional and student journalists stand together:

Professional journalists in Missouri are standing by their student counterparts in support of the New Voices bill, which aims to protect student journalists from future censorship. Former adviser at Missouri Southern State University Thomas Hanrahan voiced his support of the bill by claiming that student journalists are no different than professional journalists– he believes some of the most important journalism is coming out of schools across the nation, and limiting their free speech benefits no one.

Top online stories from 2015:

Here’s an impressive collection of some of the best in online journalism from 2015. Highlighted are 40 projects, all utilizing the digital medium to tell their stories in unique and memorable ways– and a great means of inspiration for your all of your digital stories.

Journalism is, in fact, an important component of the common core:

Has anyone ever tried to tell you that Journalism doesn’t fit into the common core? If so, you can now confidentiality tell them they’re wrong. Reading and writing nonfiction– a skill students don’t often acquire in standard English literature classes– actually increases literacy scores and comprehension across the board. This videoshows how teachers have incorporated journalism instruction as an aspect of the common core.

These things also happened this week:

The Iowa Caucus took place last night– you can read more about what happened (and what that means) right here.

The 22nd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards aired on Saturday– here are the top five moments from the event.

Our furry friend Punxsutawney Phil didn’t see his shadow this morning, which, if you believe the forecast can be predicted by a rodent, means an early spring for us this year. Thanks, Phil.